How to oil cleanse

It’s been a few years since the oil cleansing method craze first took off. I was going through my archives when I realised I’ve never written a cheat sheet on how to oil cleanse. And because the internet is full of oil cleansing horror stories, here are some guidelines you can rely on when dealing with various types of oil cleansers.

Emulsifying Balm/oil Cleansers

It’s hard to go wrong with these, Clinique has aptly named their range ‘Take the day off’. 

Basically what they do is dissolve the dirt, oil and makeup on your face then rinse clean with water.You’ll find the emulsifying feature pretty handy, especially on nights when you just want to take off your makeup and roll into bed.

 These are excellent as makeup removers but can also be used for your second cleanse if you don’t have a skin cleanser.

Non emulsifying oil/balm cleansers

Like dissolves like, so any oil that you safely apply on your skin can also be used as an oil cleanser. It will bind to dirt just like an emulsifying cleanser would, but taking it off is rather tedious because it doesn’t turn milky on contact with water.

You would be wrong to think every store bought oil cleanser is the emulsifying type. There are many non-emulsifying types and they don’t come cheap either, a total rip off if you ask me.

On the subject of taking off these oil cleansers, most people will ask you to steam your face then wipe clean with a hot face flannel. Not only do you risk broken capillaries doing this, but on swiping your face with a cotton ball and some toner, you’ll realise that your face is far from clean. 

Everything comes off with something, so don’t give up on your oil cleanser, simply use a foaming facial wash to take it off. For good measure use a face flannel to distribute the product all over your face then rinse clean.

Oil Cleansing on the cheap

If I haven’t made it obvious already, you can make your own oil cleanser. There are many recipes out there, just be careful when dealing with essential oils, coconut oil and castor oil. 

Personally I use almond oil and two or three drops of my Dr Organic face serum. As with other non-emulsifying cleansers, it’s no match for waterproof mascara, hence I only use it on a bare face.

In the fight against blemishes, wrinkles or any other skin issues you might be facing, oil cleansing is just but one tool in your arsenal. Don’t neglect other areas of your face care routine.

Thanks for stopping by!

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Maureen Wahu is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to , amazon.co.uk and other Amazon sites. 

carbonated water facial 

​We spend a lot of time debating about what are the best formulas to put on our faces when it comes to cleansers, masks and serums. However, we do not often think about the type of water we are splashing our faces with. The most you might think about is whether you should use lukewarm water, cold or hot. What about the kind of water? What about switching your tap water for something a little bit more, well, fancy? Say carbonated mineral water.

Carbonated water cleansing has been all the rage in Japan and South Korea for quite some time now.I’ve always hated that fizzy water that often comes in a green bottle, so why not wash my face with it?

But first things first, what do experts say about washing your face with carbonated water?

“Carbonated water has been reported to cause vasodilation (dilated capillaries), which would improve delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the skin,”explains dermatologist Dr. Emily M. Wise.“However, there have never been any studies in dermatology literature to validate the specific claims made by this trend.” 

Celebrity aesthetician Kate Somerville agrees. “The bubbling sensation of carbonated water can give the perception that the water is acting as micro brushes to help cleanse pores and remove dead skin (because you feel a’tingling’ effect), but that is not the case.”

 Washing my face with carbonated water reminds me of the time I used this beauty formulas face mask.
It billows up like a bubble bath, covering your every pore with a thick layer of grey, soapy suds that seemingly arise from nowhere. It didn’t do much for me but honestly, I only bought it for the bubble action. 

Without further ado, here’s how you wash your face with carbonated water. 

Step 1:
Choose a carbonated water with absolutely no artificial scents or coloring. No lemon, lime or any flavorings, either; you want pure carbonated mineral water.


Step 2:
Fill a large bowl with half regular water and half carbonated water. You want a 1:1 ratio.
Step 3:
Dunk your makeup-free face in the bowl and hold for 10-15 seconds.

I added my own twist by using the water to rinse away my facial cleanser instead of dunking my face in a bowl. I also used the undiluted carbonated water to tone my face. You probably shouldn’t do this if you have sensitive skin. 

Verdict 

The bubbles when  paired with said cleanser actually do a nice job of cleaning out my pores. I performed this facial on myself last night and woke up to glowy skin this morning. 

Would I do this on a regular basis? Washing your face with carbonated water on a daily basis is prohibited. This also has the potential to bring underlying pimples to the fore. I wouldn’t use this when I feel a break out coming on. However, I will keep some carbonated water on hand to use as a toner on days when I want to give my acid toner a break.

 Thanks for stopping by!

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The dirt on foaming cleansers

 Hi there,

You have probably heard that non-foaming cleansers are better for your skin. Perhaps you’ve even unsuccessfully tried to replace your foaming facial cleanser with a non-foaming one.

You read articles and posts on the internet and a lot of people will tell you that foaming cleansers are bad. But when you use them the results are a million times better than with a product that does not lather! (oily skinned girls can relate) 

So why is everyone hating on foaming cleansers? 
Sodium laureth sulphate , or sodium lauryl ether sulphate ( SLES), sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and Ammonium lauryl sulphate (ALS).

These are anionic detergents and surfactants found in many personal care products. They are inexpensive and very effective foaming agents. They function in a cleaning product as a surfactant, wetting surfaces, emulsifying oils, and suspending soil so that they can be rinsed.

All that sounds very nice but it comes with a few disadvantages when you’re using a sulphate based surfucant:

1.Toxic solvents, including carcinogenic nitrates are used in the manufacturing of SLS, traces
of which can remain in the product.

2. SLS is a penetration enhancer, meaning that its molecules are so small they’re able to cross the membranes of your body’s cells.
Once cells are compromised, they become more vulnerable to other toxic chemicals that may be with the SLS.

3.They cause skin irritation and corrosion, and over time, lead to increased dryness. You know what that means—more visible fine lines and wrinkles.

If you love foaming facial cleansers, you have no excuse for not using a sulphate free one. They are easily available. My favourite ones have salicylic acid in them too. These come in handy when you’ve got no time to fuss around with face flannels or double cleansing, you just want to wash your face and go straight to bed.

There are not too many choices for sulphate free shower creams and gels. So far I’ve tried dove nutrium moisture in almost all its variants and Giovanni shower cream which I LOVE 😍 😍 

You might also want to try Dr. Organic shower gels, they’ll definitely be on my list when I go shopping next time. 

Thanks for stopping by!
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Budget Cleanser.

I hope it’s not too late to say Happy New Year! 
The holidays are gone now and so are most of my cleansers. As a rule, I make sure to have more than one cleanser at a time, these come in handy at different occasions

1. The foaming cleanser.
This comes in handy when you want to take off your makeup in a single step. Also great for cleansing in the morning as it leaves you feeling extra fresh.
When picking a foaming cleanser, always choose one without SLS.

2. The cleansing balm/oil.
If you have sensitive skin, clinique cleansing balm is one of the best options for your skin. It might be a little pricey but it’s well worth it. You can use this on its own or in combination with another product to double cleanse. Were it not that I hated the greasy feeling when applying this product, I would use it everyday.

3. The astringent.
When you mention astringent, most people will think of those alcohol laden toners. By astringent, I mean a watery cleanser or toner that you use as your second step cleanser or as your only cleanser if not wearing makeup (this kind is left on your skin and not rinsed away with water). Some people use rose water and glycerin but the moisture that this mixture lends to my skin always gives me breakouts (I have oily skin). If you have oily acne prone skin, choose a mild astringent with salicylic acid. This will work even better than a foaming cleanser with salicylic acid.

4. The cleansing lotion.
This is great for days when you don’t have access to clean water (or don’t want to touch water).
Use this  with a cotton ball to take off your makeup then follow with an astringent.

This beauty formulas cleanser is an example of a cleansing lotion.
For a person on a budget, this could be your only cleanser until you’re able to add more cleansers to your collection.

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Pros
– Cheap
-does not contain SLS
– contains salicylic acid to prevent and treat existing breakouts.

Cons

– Cannot be used around the eyes or to remove eye makeup.
– Has to be rinsed away with water.

At 295 shillings (Nakumatt TRM and Ebrahims) this deal is too good to miss. 

Thanks for stopping by!
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Update 

This cleanser is best used as a second cleanse cleanser. 

Japanese/Asian Skincare.

Hello there,
Are you a person who appreciates an intricate skin routine? If so then Japanese skincare might just be the thing for you.

The usual suspect for innovation in beauty is Europe and most notably France, which in recent years has given us micellar water, a good replacement for wet wipes when you cant be bothered to use a rinse off cleanser. (Note that I’d never be caught dead cleansing with micellar water alone).

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The Japanese are known to have youthful skin, so lets steal some of their secrets to keep our skin looking youthful too.

Rather than list down a step by step skincare routine, I will explain each principle behind Japanese skincare.

Double cleansing.
This process is prevalent especially in Japan. I have written an entire post on double cleansing which you can visit to familiarize yourself with the concept. Basically it’s the use of a two tiered cleansing routine to effectively remove dirt and makeup. The choice of your cleansing products is up to you but the Japanese notably use oils and balms for the first cleanse.

Emphasis on UV protection and whitening.
Asian skincare products reflect the sun-sensitive attitudes of its customers. Many of them contain built in sunscreens and whitening ingredients to fade out dark spots and freckles.

Several layers of hydration.
In this layered process, hydration begins with toner, which is more commonly referred to as a “skin softener”. These toners never strip the skin of moisture or try to work in some extra cleaning like you might find in Western products. After toners come essences, serums, and finally rich creams, which deeply hydrate the skin and fill out fine lines.
The sheet mask, an optional step can also be squeezed in here.

Innovative ingredients.
Asian skincare companies are quite a few years ahead of their Western counterparts.Competition and high demand from customers allows them to extensively research new ingredients.
Forget the Cliniques, Elizabeth Ardens and Mary Kays, Japanese products are the real deal. For the most part, product claims are not just a marketing gimmick they actually do what they claim to do.

Skincare part of overall health.
Good skin is an entire philosophy: when you have good skin, you can wear less makeup, look much healthier, and seem younger as well. The layered routine is almost ritualistic in its execution, and it can be the best part of one’s morning or night. It surpasses fulfilling a physical purpose, and can promote one’s emotional and mental well-being too.

Overall quality.
If it hasn’t already been made obvious, Asian women take their skincare very seriously! The market is highly competitive. Interestingly, brands do not really compete on price as customers tend to favor quality over price and do not mind paying more for a superior product. Discerning customers keep skincare brands on their toes. Therefore, you can find great skincare at almost every price point, which makes Asian drugstore items a hot commodity around the world.

Is the Japanese routine right for my skin type?
This routine can work for all skin types but I would suggest reducing the layers of hydration for oily skinned girls.

Thanks for stopping by!
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